Should They Stay or Should They Go Now?

In 2013, the Colts had what many believe to be a successful season; yet the future looks even brighter for this young group of players. The team should have over $30M in salary cap space this upcoming offseason, and that’s not including possible cap saving cuts, so there’s money to spread around. The PG (Pre-Grigson) regime almost exclusively invested in their own players, which provided a stable base of players but never truly plugged any of the glaring holes of Colts teams past. This is the first offseason that Grigson will need to make some tough choices on which current Colts to lock up long term and who gets to wade into the free agency pool.

The

             “Not Looking So Good”

                                                         Group:
These players have likely seen their last season with a horseshoe on their helmet! Unless they take a significant pay cut and Grigson can’t find anyone better to replace them with.

Mike McGlynn
Darrius Heyward-Bey
Ahmad Bradshaw
Pat Angerer

These guys have all either underperformed or been injury prone. McGlynn has been bad at RG. DHB cannot catch the ball but has shown promise on special teams. Bradshaw has too many injuries. Angerer also is an injury risk and was placed on IR after being a healthy scratch the week before; the emergence of McNary has made Angerer expendable.

The

“These Guys Need To Be Back”

                                                               Group:
These players need to be brought back because they provide production on the field and have made a positive impact in the community.

Pat McAfee
Antoine Bethea
Vontae Davis

Pat McAfee has been a solid weapon for the Colts over the past two seasons and given Pagano stubborn demeanor on how this team will run the football, it’s a necessity to have a quality punter that can pin the opposing team back and reverse the field. Bethea has been a model of consistency this year and has earned his $5.75M salary. My only concern with investing further into Bethea is his age, 29, and the fact that he is asked to make so many tackles year in and year out. Those tackles can really take a toll on a player of Bethea’s size. Davis did himself no favors over the middle of the season. He got burned bad in several games. When his head is on straight, he’s a legitimate top 20 CB in the league. However, Grigson must make the decision to invest heavily in a CB that plays when he wants to, and that’s scary for Colts fans.

The

“Consider It But Only If The Price Is Right”

                                                                                        Group:
These guys have performed well this year but cost too much on their current salaries.

Donald Brown
Adam Vinateri

Donald Brown has run very well this season after 4 years of almost complete ineptitude. He counted $2.72M against this year’s cap. He’ll likely be the RB3 next year with Trent taking over the RB1 and Vick Ballard returning to take over the RB2. Needless to say, almost $3M for a third string RB is a little steep. Adam has been a model of consistency over the past 7 years with the Colts and before that in NE. However, he counted $3.4M against the cap this year, far too much for a kicker. Now I do not believe McAfee should handle FG duties as well, and would like to see Adam end his career with the Colts, but am concerned about investing too much money in a kicker.

Needless to say, Grigson has some decisions to make regarding several big name Colts free agents. It will be interesting to see how Grigson’s philosophy will compare with past regimes. Regardless, it should be fun to watch.

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